DISCLAIMER: Open-water swimming is inherently dangerous. Open-water swimmers risk drowning, hypothermia, hyperthermia, heart attacks, panic attacks, cramping, jelly fish stings, fish bites, boat or jet-ski collisions, collisions with floating or submerged objects (including other swimmers), and other calamities that can be injurious, disabling or fatal! The "West Neck Pod" is an informal association of open-water swimmers who swim "outside the lines" with no lifeguard protection, it has no formal membership, organizational structure or legal identity, and its participants, including the author of this blog, make no representations and assume no liability with respect to its group open-water swims. All swimmers who participate in West Neck Pod group open-water swims do so at their own risk. Be careful out there!

Friday, November 15, 2013

Would you like that OWS straight up? or on the rocks?

Yes, those are frozen smiles on our faces...
Now that was refreshing! 
Gae Polisner's earlier Facebook plea for company in a mid-afternoon swim "if it gets sunny" (it did!), was met with a flurry of wistfully regretful declines, but Carole Wickham and I were able to answer the call, and a Polar Tri-Pod entered the "Oh-my-god-I-can't-believe-how-cold-this-is" water at about 2:45 this afternoon.... "How cold was it," you ask? According to my trusty laser thermometer -- employed at mid-thigh depth as it is every time -- and which most recently gave a temperature reading in the low (very low!) 40s -- the water temperature this afternoon was an unbelievable 35-36 degrees!  Just to put things in perspective, the coldest water the West Neck Polar Pod has swum in previously was a bone-chilling 37 degrees -- and that was in January! If it were not for the relatively warm (55 degrees) air temperature today, and a relatively sedate 4 mph wind, we probably would have opted to go out for cheeseburgers instead...But we were there, already half-suited up, and it would have been unthinkable to turn around and leave without even getting wet...So we swam -- with flash-frozen faces, hands and feet  -- not far (back and forth between the dock and the jetty), and not long (20+ minutes) -- but  enough to get our endorphins pumping and make the swim and the effort completely and utterly and unforgettably worthwhile....!

Naturally we'll be doing it again tomorrow!  See you in the Salt!

(By the way, salt water doesn't freeze until the temperature reaches 28.4 degrees Fahrenheit -- so we've still got lots of open-water swimming ahead of us!)

6 comments:

  1. This blog is very unique! I really enjoyed reading this post. I'm glad you have water so close you can elect to take an afternoon swim. In Calgary, water isn't a problem either. Just the cold is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Sam! I thought you Canadians were impervious to the cold! (one of our Founding members, Rob Martell, is Canadian and he could have been a Poster Boy for that proposition!) Well, if you're ever in New York, please come join us for an afternoon swim -- at least from May through November!

      Delete
  2. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Enjoyed all of the different writing and posts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Shaneka! Hopefully I'll be back in the Salt and writing again soon!

      Delete
  4. Great Informative blog.. Now a days waste is very big problem for human health... So we need waste management services and environmental services for good human health and keep clean the environment.

    ReplyDelete